Telling Weather Using Clouds: How?

Among many methods to predict or tell the weather without the need of a forecast, telling weather using clouds is one and has been around, like the others, since how long when meteorological devices weren’t as common as is now and people mostly relied on observation because of it.

Different cloud formations can indicate different kinds of weather to come or that is already present. By knowing how to tell the weather, you can better protect and or prepare yourself accordingly.

Telling Weather Using Clouds: Different Kinds of Clouds


Telling Weather Using Clouds How Cirrus

Cirrus Clouds

These are the clouds that appear very high up in the sky and look like thin strips. They usually are 6 kilometers or more above the ground and usually are signs of fair weather. In colder climates, however, clouds such as these that begin to multiply and are joined by increasing winds steadily blowing from a northerly direction might tell of an oncoming blizzard.

Telling Weather Using Clouds How CumulusCumulus Clouds

These are the clouds that are fluffy and white. They appear much lower than cirrus clouds and often are signs of fair weather. They usually appear around a sunny midday, looking like flat-bottomed cotton balls. As the day progresses, they may become bigger and go higher into the atmosphere, clustering up to look like a mountain of clouds. These then can turn into storm clouds.

Telling Weather Using Clouds How Stratus

Stratus Clouds

These are the clouds that appear very low, have a gray color to them, and often making an even gray layer across the whole sky. They usually are signs of rain.

Telling Weather Using Clouds How Nimbus

Nimbus Clouds

These are rain clouds, uniform in gray, that come to stretch across the entire sky.

Telling Weather Using Clouds How Cumulonimbus

Cumulonimbus Clouds

This is the cloud formation resulting from a build-up of cumulus clouds. They extend to great heights and form in an anvil shape. Thunderstorms are expected abound if these clouds are moving over to your direction.

Telling Weather Using Clouds Cirrostratus

Cirrostratus Clouds

These are the clouds that form a fairly uniform layer of stratus clouds up high which are darker than cirrus clouds. They usually indicate good weather.

Telling Weather Using Clouds Cirrocumulus

Cirrocumulus clouds

These are small, white, and round clouds that appear at a high altitude. They too also usually indicate good weather.

Telling Weather Using Clouds How Scuds

Scuds

These are loose and vapory clouds. If driven before the wind, it is a sign of continuing bad weather.

Telling weather using clouds is but one way of telling weather without the need of a forecast. Other ways shall be written for  in the future.


If it’ll rain, you better should know how to ready yourself for a flood.

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